January Winter Share

dapper

*A couple of notes:

  • We have been running low on our egg cartons for a while, and even if you don’t get eggs from us, we’d take whatever 1 dozen cardboard cartons you  have. Thanks!
  • Also, I would recommend using your squash earlier rather than later as it has been a touchy year for storage. It freezes well after roasting or steaming if you want to extend its shelf life.

 

Even as what was slush is now solid ice on all the sidewalks, I am trying to freeze the memory of how everything looked the past couple of weeks with snow magically stuck to every branch along my drive to the farm and my walks around. I don’t know if I’ve ever seen such a winter-wonderland look last for so long.

A couple of weeks ago my life was full of hustle and bustle and friends and family. I got to share some Food Farm carrots with my mom’s side of the family and some pickled green beans with my dad’s side. Everyone approved. I love the time of year where people make a point to gather together and linger for a bit, but I’m glad it’s just once a year. Now I am enjoying working my way through a book I got over the holidays, and tucking back in my ornaments. My wintery tea towels get to hang out a little longer.

This seems to be a time of year for reflection and trying to put one’s best foot forward. I guess the fact that I’m saying that makes me a week late to the resolution party. But if 20181207_161125you’re on your way into the new year with aspirations and expectations, I hope they’ve been going well. Trying to make a change by adding or subtracting things from your routine is hard. It can be overwhelming, the fact that personal change is hard enough while also knowing that societal changes are all the harder because it takes large groups of people working hard for a single goal.

As members of our Food Farm CSA, in my mind you are all actively part of making this one change happen in your kitchens, and thus, in our larger (global) food system. The fact that you have signed up for a share, and get it every week or month during a given season might seem small, but for every parsnip you eat and batch of soup you make it is one more step that adds to a healthier world. Not just because of the food being good for you, but because of the direct impact of supporting a farm in your area.

With ever increasing ways available to buy and consume food, I am thankful that you’ve chosen a way that supports the Food Farm, and has for over 2 decades. I feel like a broken record in saying it, but I know there are easier ways to eat than with food from a CSA. So thank you for starting another year with us, and taking time to scrub your potatoes and break into a cabbage or two.

For the crew,

Karin


In your share this month:

Green Cabbage – Orange and Purple Carrots – Yellow Onions – Parsnips – Russet and French Fingerling Potatoes – Kabocha and Delicata Squash


Carrot Salad With Harissa Feta and Mint

3/4 pound carrots, peeled, trimmed and coarsely grated20190104_104141
4 tablespoons olive oil
1 crushed clove of garlic
1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds or about half as much, ground (I used seeds but ground them first)
3/4 teaspoon cumin seeds or about half as much, ground (I used the seed but ground them first, again)
1/2 teaspoon paprika
3/4 teaspoon harissa (for a solid kick of heat; adjust yours to taste, and to the heat level of your harissa)
1/2 teaspoon sugar
3 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons flat leaf parsley, finely chopped
2 tablespoons fresh mint, finely chopped
100 grams feta, crumbled or chopped into bits
In a small sauté pan, cook the garlic, caraway, cumin, paprika, harissa and sugar in the oil until fragrant, about one to two minutes. Remove from heat and add the lemon juice and a pinch of salt. Pour over the carrots and mix. Add the herbs and mix. Leave to infuse for an hour and add the feta before eating.


Cabbage and Lime Salad with Roasted Peanuts

1/2 small red cabbage, trimmed, cored, and shredded (about 6 cups)
1/2 small green cabbage, trimmed, cored, and shredded (about 6 cups)
1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
1 bunch fresh baby spinach, stemmed and cut into 1/2-inch wide ribbons (about 4 cups loosely packed)
1/4 cup fresh lime juice (from about 2 small limes)
1 tablespoon Dijon or other salty prepared mustard
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 cup peanut oil
1/2 cup roasted unsalted peanuts, coarsely chopped
Freshly ground black pepper

In a large bowl, toss the shredded red and green cabbage with the salt. Transfer the cabbage to a colander and let it drain for two hours. (I was in a rush and did this in one. It was still nicely wilted, but of course could have been even softer.)

If you’re worried about the cabbage being too salty when you’re done with the salting process, taste a piece of cabbage and if it concerns you, rinse and drain the cabbage well. This is not a suggestion in the original recipe, but something I suspect might bother some people.

Put the salted, drained cabbage back into your (rinsed and dried) large bowl and add the spinach. In a medium bowl, whisk the lime juice, mustard and cumin together. Add the peanut oil in a thin stream, whisking constantly until the ingredients are thoroughly emulsified. Toss the salad with the dressing and add the roasted peanuts. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

This salad is best served immediately, but it does keep surprisingly well in the fridge for a day or two.

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